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13.06 DR-TA Expository Lesson

 


Plan Author: David Riddick
Date Created: 7/2/2003 7:39:32 PM PST

 

School:
Dyer St. Elementary

Grade Level:
4

Students:
27 Students. 14 boys and 13 girls. 4 EO's; 6 IFEP's; 3 RFEP's; 14 ELD3-4: GATE class - advanced learners
Modifications for English Learner:
- Use high frequency vocabulary when possible
- Speech should be at a natural but slower rate than normal and enunciation should be clear
- Use full referents rather than pronouns
- Ask direct questions instead of indirect questions
- Instructions should convey one idea or action each
- Repetition, restatements, and redundant grammatical structures should be used

Subject Area(s):
Reading

Goal(s):
Students will have an appreciation of a Directed Reading-Thinking Activity to reference Bloom's Taxonomy chart to elicit higher level thinking questions to ask one another.

Concept(s):
Students learn through a Directed Reading-Thinking Activity to make predictions and read or listen to confirm their higher level thinking predictions in an expository story.

Standards:

CA- CCTC: Aligned CSTP's and TPE's

• Standard : CSTP: Standard for Engaging and Supporting all Students in Learning
TPE: C. Engaging and Supporting Students in Learning
CSTP Description: Teachers build on students’ prior knowledge, life experience, and interests to achieve learning goals for all students. Teachers use a variety of instructional strategies and resources that respond to students’ diverse needs. Teachers facilitate challenging learning experiences for all students in environments that promote autonomy, interaction and choice. Teachers actively engage all students in problem solving and critical thinking within and across subject matter areas. Concepts and skills are taught in ways that encourage students to apply them in real-life contexts that make subject matter meaningful. Teachers assist all students to become self-directed learners who are able to demonstrate, articulate, and evaluate what they learn.

• CSTP Key Element : Promoting self-directed, reflective learning for all students.

 Question : help all students to develop and use strategies for knowing about, reflecting on, and monitoring their own learning?


CA- California K-12 Academic Content Standards

• Subject : English Language Arts

• Grade : Grade Four

• Area : Reading

• Sub-Strand 2.0: Reading Comprehension
Students read and understand grade-level-appropriate material. They draw upon a variety of comprehension strategies as needed (e.g., generating and responding to essential questions, making predictions, comparing information from several sources). The selections in Recommended Readings in Literature, Kindergarten Through Grade Eight illustrate the quality and complexity of the materials to be read by students. In addition to their regular school reading, students read one-half million words annually, including a good representation of grade-level-appropriate narrative and expository text (e.g., classic and contemporary literature, magazines, newspapers, online information).

• Concept : Comprehension and Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text

 Standard 2.3: Make and confirm predictions about text by using prior knowledge and ideas presented in the text itself, including illustrations, titles, topic sentences, important words, and foreshadowing clues.

Objective(s):
Cognitive: Students will learn to reference Bloom's Taxonomy Chart to elicit higher level prediction questions.

Observable behavior: Students will read along with teacher in beginning of the lesson, and continue the story reading independently.

Criteria: Given student composed comprehension questions, students will demonstrate his/her ability to answer comprehension questions of "Mae Jemison: Space Scientist" with 70% accuracy.

Prerequisite Background Skills/Knowledge:
Students are familiar with the topic and unit theme of the story "Mae Jemison: Space Scientist." Students have been introduced and are familiar with the words in the vocabulary section.

Vocabulary / Language Skills:
Listening: Students listen to verbal instructions given during directed lesson. ELD students are given help by peer tutors as teacher speaks.

Speaking: Students participate in directed lesson by raising hands and answering questions.

Writing: Students will take notes and write their Language Arts notebooks.

Reading: Students read from Open Court anthology.

Vocabulary: astronaut, excelled, specialized, qualified, applicants, simulates, techniques, fascinated, accomplished, limited, demanding, resumed

Materials:
1) Pencil & Paper
2) Transparencies
3) Transparency pen
4) Open Court Anthologies
5) Comprehension questions "Mae Jemison: Space Scientist"
6) Blooms Taxonomy Questions handout

Classroom Management:
During directed lesson, students are seated in assigned seats, which are 2-person desks.

I will give out extra credit points for students who participate and cooperate with lesson.

Extra credit points for actively engaged students

Procedure:
Procedure: Open

Ask students if they ever wake up in the morning and wonder/predict what the day will be like. Discuss with students some of their predictions for the day. Ask students if at the end of the day they ever reflect and compare what they thought their day was going to be like with what actually happened.

Tell students this is a successful strategy when reading:
1) Predict what will happen
2) Read to see if your prediction is true
3) Reflect on what you predicted vs. what actually happened.


Procedure: Body

Input:

1st: Point out the standards we are working on (posted).

2nd: This lesson focuses on higher level thinking prediction questions, specifically on analysis type questions. Pass out Bloom's taxonomy chart to students.

Analysis questions are ones that explain what makes up a character? Students will analyze or explain why a character is the way he/she is.

3rd: Predict what will happen
Introduce the story. Before beginning to read, discuss the unit theme, “Risks and Consequences” and pictures related to the story to draw on prior knowledge. Guide students into coming up with their own analysis questions. For example;

What do you think a story with this title, "Mae Jemison: Space Scientist"?
What do you think might happen to the characters in this story?
Do the pictures give you any ideas about what might happen in this story?

4th: Read to see if your prediction is true
Read the beginning of the story. Students read along with teacher to the beginning of the story. Ask students to confirm or reject their predictions by responding to questions. Remind students there are no good or bad predications. Students should be open to all plausible predictions.

5th: Reflect on what you predicted vs. what actually happened.
Students reflect on their predictions. Have students talk about the story, expressing their feelings and making connections to their own lives and experiences.

6th: Students make comprehension questions from the Analysis section of Bloom’s Taxonomy chart. Teacher selects the most appropriate questions to give to the entire class. For example:

What are the parts or features of...?
Classify...according to...
How does...compare/contrast with...?
What evidence can you list for...?



Guided Practice:

I will describe how to use the Analysis section of Bloom's Taxonomy chart to elicit higher level thinking predictions.

I will activate their prior knowledge of the story and theme.

To check for understanding, I use non-verbal hand cues to assess for confusion and clarification.

Modifications for English Learner:
- Use high frequency vocabulary when possible
- Speech should be at a natural but slower rate than normal and enunciation should be clear
- Use full referents rather than pronouns
- Ask direct questions instead of indirect questions
- Instructions should convey one idea or action each
- Repetition, restatements, and redundant grammatical structures should be used


Independent Practice:

Students will read independently to answer their own higher level thinking questions.

Students will develop and answer their own comprehension handout on "Mae Jemison: Space Scientist."

High achieving students will be allowed to expand their understanding by writing an extension story telling us the background of either main character explaining how that character came to be and present it to the class.

Procedure: Close

To close the lesson students will share questions that gave them difficulty. In a grand conversation, we will discuss this questions and why students responded the way they did.

Assessment:
Students will demonstrate his/her ability to answer comprehension questions of "Mae Jemison: Space Scientist" by correctly responding to student composed comprehension questions with 70% accuracy.

Assessment/Rubrics:

Attachments:

 1. 

Blooms Taxonomy Questions.doc

 2. 

Modifications for English Learners

Reflection:
The objective of the lesson was achieved. Students were able to answer comprehension questions of “Mae Jemison: Space Scientist” by correctly responding to student composed comprehension questions with 70% accuracy. I worked with students who were struggling while the other students were able to ask and answer one another’s questions. Upon reflection, I’m not sure if it’s best to have the students who are struggling work exclusively with myself. I’ve noticed that students I set aside to help usually do not show as much growth as students who receive help from their peers. This could be due to the fact that these are often the lowest students in the class. However, it could also be as a result of hearing the same instruction restated twice. I need to vary the way I work with students with special needs. Strategies include using high frequency vocabulary when possible, use of full referents instead of pronouns, and asking direct questions instead of indirect questions.

I believe I need to alternate between peer tutoring and having students work with myself. I correctly anticipated students would be engaged by working with one another. It was exciting to see them passionately debate their correct answer. Students felt they had a vested interest in the correct answer because they came up with the questions themselves.

I did not anticipate the yes and no questions students developed. Several students developed questions requiring a yes or no answer. If I were to instruct this lesson again, I would be sure to emphasize students must ask “why” or “how” questions. Answers must include details, rather than a yes or no response. This lesson was appropriate and on grade level because it promoted self-directed, reflective learning for all students.